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Ethnology of Tongareva

Figure 61. Ruvettus hook: a, parts of hook; b, c, sinker attachments from Tongareva and Cook Islands (after Nordhoff). a, parts of hook: 1, shank limb; 2, point limb; 3, bend (kopu); 4, knob (reke) to support lashing; 5, lashing of snood and shank; 6, snood (matai); 7, point (reinga); 8, lashing, point limb to vertical end of point. b, Tongarevan attachment: strip of hala (1) is knotted at one end (2), which is passed through split made in strip to form running noose around coral sinker (3); ot…

Figure 61. Ruvettus hook: a, parts of hook; b, c, sinker attachments from Tongareva and Cook Islands (after Nordhoff). a, parts of hook: 1, shank limb; 2, point limb; 3, bend (kopu); 4, knob (reke) to support lashing; 5, lashing of snood and shank; 6, snood (matai); 7, point (reinga); 8, lashing, point limb to vertical end of point. b, Tongarevan attachment: strip of hala (1) is knotted at one end (2), which is passed through split made in strip to form running noose around coral sinker (3); other end is tied to straight end of forked stick (4); fork (5) is hooked over bend of hook (6); baited hook is lowered and, when sinker touches bottom, forked stick falls away from slackened line, and sinker is detached. c, Cook Islands attachment: longer strip of hala (1) in similar method attaches sinker (3), but upper end of strip (1) is passed over hook bend, brought around shank limb, and end (5) is passed under loop; weight of stone presses short end against hook and prevents it from slipping; on release of pressure when sinker touches bottom, loop slackens and frees sinker.

Figure 61. Ruvettus hook: a, parts of hook; b, c, sinker attachments from Tongareva and Cook Islands (after Nordhoff). a, parts of hook: 1, shank limb; 2, point limb; 3, bend (kopu); 4, knob (reke) to support lashing; 5, lashing of snood and shank; 6, snood (matai); 7, point (reinga); 8, lashing, point limb to vertical end of point. b, Tongarevan attachment: strip of hala (1) is knotted at one end (2), which is passed through split made in strip to form running noose around coral sinker (3); other end is tied to straight end of forked stick (4); fork (5) is hooked over bend of hook (6); baited hook is lowered and, when sinker touches bottom, forked stick falls away from slackened line, and sinker is detached. c, Cook Islands attachment: longer strip of hala (1) in similar method attaches sinker (3), but upper end of strip (1) is passed over hook bend, brought around shank limb, and end (5) is passed under loop; weight of stone presses short end against hook and prevents it from slipping; on release of pressure when sinker touches bottom, loop slackens and frees sinker.