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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 7, Issue 8 (February 1, 1933)

The Irish Railways

The Irish Railways.

Ireland has of late been much in the limelight, and a little more than usual has been heard of the somewhat neglected railways of Erin's Isle—neglected, that is, from the viewpoint of publicity. Politics, as such, do not come within the scope of these Letters, but there can be no doubt the partition of Ireland into sections—the Free State and Northern Ireland—has not been helpful to railway operation. The Irish railways, however,
A British-Built Express Passenger Locomotive. One of the new three-cylinder compound engines introduced on the G.N. Railway of Ireland

A British-Built Express Passenger Locomotive.
One of the new three-cylinder compound engines introduced on the G.N. Railway of Ireland

have endeavoured to make the best of the situation, and in the Free State one big system—the Great Southern Railway—has been set up, with headquarters in Dublin. In Northern Ireland, outside the Free State jurisdiction, several of the railways are allied to the lines serving Britain. One important Irish railway—the Great Northern—operates partly in the Free State and partly in Northern Ireland. There have just been acquired by this goahead system a batch of new threecylinder compound express passenger locomotives of the leading bogie type and of 4—4—0 wheel arrangement, the product of Messrs. Beyer, Peacock and Co., Ltd., of Manchester.

The new G.N. locomotives have a steam pressure of 250lb. per square inch. The high-pressure cylinder measures 17 ¼ in. by 26in., and the two low-pressure cylinders 19in. by 26in. Total heating surface is 1,527.5 sq. ft., grate area 25.22 sq. ft., and tractive effort 23,762lb. Weight of engine and tender in full working order is 103 tons. Utilisation of these new locomotives in the Dublin-Belfast fast passenger services is resulting in a reduction in journey time of half-an-hour over the 112 ½ miles run, while an engine of the new type is covering the 54 ½ miles between Dublin and Dundalk in 54 minutes.