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Building Today, Volume 1 Number 2 (January 1937)

A Busy Man's Garden

page 40

A Busy Man's Garden

In these days of crowded hobbies, sporting activities and suchlike, which absorb much of the home owner's leisure hours, the question to be decided is whether the members of the household wish to participate in the management of the garden or not.

Should no member of the home be a keen amateur gardener, and there be no wish to employ an outside gardener, the designer should confine his efforts to planning a garden that will reduce the labour of upkeep to a minimum.

This may be effected in various ways, including that of "permanent planting," the use of shrubs of more or less compact growth to obviate constant pruning, the introduction of paved walks, page 41and the laying of natural rock gardens with no rare or difficult plants. Although the latter would need a certain amount of weeding, the attention required would not equal that of the ordinary flower bed, and this should add to its popularity.

Labour Saving Plants. Instead of relying on annuals and spring and autumn bedding plants, the main planting in this case would consist of perennials of the type that can remain undisturbed for some time, together with flowering shrubs, cypresses, etc., freely employed. A mixed shrubbery border is the most saving of all, but care should be taken to make a choice of shrubs that require little, if any, pruning.

A Shrub border will be of interest all the year round if it be picked with due care both for shape and colour blending, and a mixed shrubbery border can be in itself a delightfully attractive garden, interesting yet inexpensive in upkeep.

Should a smaller border be the owner's wish, the herbaceous border would take precedence over annuals and bedding flowers, which require lifting every year. Here again the plants must be carefully chosen, as rank growth will defeat the object for which the border is intended.

Garden Feature at Residence, Dominion Road. Suitable treatment of boundary wall, converting an otherwise 'uninteresting wall into a garden feature, comprising a wall, fountain and lily pool.H. L. Massey, F.N.Z.I.A., A.R.I.B.A., Architect.

Garden Feature at Residence, Dominion Road. Suitable treatment of boundary wall, converting an otherwise 'uninteresting wall into a garden feature, comprising a wall, fountain and lily pool.
H. L. Massey, F.N.Z.I.A., A.R.I.B.A., Architect.

A Garden planned on these lines could be kept in good condition with the minimum of labour and skill, and would nevertheless provide all the neatness and beauty which are indispensable to the appearance of a property, in spite of the fact that its owner's hobby may not be gardening.