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Home & Building, Volume 12 Number 6 (June-July 1950)

Some Dramatic Flower Arrangements

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Some Dramatic Flower Arrangements

From "Flower Arranging" and "Homes and Flowers" by courtesy of The Coco-Cola Company.

We are indebted to The Coco-Cola Company, of Atlanta, Ga., for produced and printed and to date several million copies have been permission to reproduce selections from the second and third volumes distributed. In an introduction to the second volume, Richardson of their excellent series of handbooks on flower arranging, the first Wright, Editor-in-Chief of "House & Garden" and Chairman of the of which appeared in 1940. The books are the work of Laura Lee International Flower Show Committee, refers to the increasing role Burroughs and the two which we have contain some of the most of flowers in home decoration and the growth of flower arranging brilliant floral compositions we have ever seen. They are splendidly as a cultural interest.

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These examples, excellent though they are, are intended rather to stimulate the imagination than to be copied exactly. As Laura Lee Burroughs says, "You do not have to have the same flowers that we have used, nor the same containers. Perhaps the pictures will inspire you to use a piece of pine in a different way, a gnarled root or maybe leaves that you had overlooked. Weeds, vegetables, sugar cane, succulents, ice cubes, cacti, seed pods and sticks and stones—all have possibilities. The way things are assembled—the design behind the arrangement—is what makes them interesting. Remember—those arrangements that are really the most fun are the ones you make out of some ridiculous everyday material that others look [unclear: a] but do not see."

Before you start, collect your tools and accessories. You'll need holders, chicken page break wire, scissors, clippers, clay, syphon and vases and bowls of various and good shapes which are not necessarily expensive. Then study your flowers, their personality, design and colour — and visualise the complete composition. Be prepared for disappointments but also be prepared for the enthusiastic praise of your friends.

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1.Pitcher Plant—These so-called flowers are really the leaves of the plant Sar racenia, which was discovered a long time ago by Dr. Sarrazin of Quebec. The stiff straight leaves look well in modern bowls and surroundings. They are arranged here in an American pottery bowl. The little fawns were used as twins and the "leaves" turned so that their tops repeated the line of the ears of the fawns. The tallest leaf of the pitcher plant was fastened in the needle holder first. Others, cut at different lengths, were graduated down with leaves of the yucca adding a staccato effect. All the stems were placed as closely together as possible. The pitcher plant leaves have a delicate veining all through them which is similar to the crackled texture of the pottery bowl.
2.Corn and Seed Pods Far from florists and in a creative mood, this arrangement was planned and created in ten minutes—two stalks of corn and a few seed pods of koelreuteria, the golden-rain-tree. The corn, cut to different lengths was stuck into a heavy needle holder in a pipe organ position. The seed pods were spiralled round the corn, the highest pod fastened into the highest piece.
3.Chinese Inspiration These Chinese dogs—we don't know whether they're pleased or not—form a very definite part of this composition of tulips, tulip buds and variegated pandanus leaves. The flowers are in a Chinese pillow vase, another slightly larger, being used, for the base. As there were only a few tulips they were made subordinate to the pandanus, which tower over them.
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4.Water Lilies and White Swan. The aim here was to emphasize the lovely watery quality of the Audubon print. The tropical waterlilies are Mrs. Pring (white), and St. Louis (yellow), both hybrids originated at the, Missouri Botanical Garden. The green stalk is Egyptian papyrus. To prevent the orchids closing at night, drop a little warm paraffin into the centre of each flower. Accessories— holder incorporated in vase. Vases selected because they repeated th colour of the water in the print and were delicate enough to hold waterlilies.
5.In Blossom Time. Two curved sprays of pear blossom, pruned of unnecessary twigs, with leaves, buds and flowers of narcissi. To have pear blossom early, cut with fairly long stems, plunge into a bucket of deep, lukewarm water, keep in moderate temperature away from strong sunlight until they start to open (in a week or two). Accessories—Chinese porcelain figure. Round needle holder Round lacquered disc and pottery bowl, selected to emphasize the curves of the arrangement and for colour contrast.
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Daylilies and Crystal. Hemerocallis and funkia leaves, with one pandanus leaf for height. Accessories— Crystal bird from Czechoslovakia. Vase of crystal was desired for the setting and cylindrical shape suited the vertical design visualised.

A crystal vase necessitates a different mechanical treatment to hold the flowers. The holder must be covered to achieve a satisfactory effect and the pattern of the stems under water must be pleasing. The flowers here were held by pieces of lead cut into half-inch strips, wound round the plants and hooked over the vase, then covered with a leaf. Another method is to fasten chicken wire

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over the top of the vase and cover it with leaves.

7.The Curved Line of Beauty. These flowers, except the cinerarias, were all picked from the garden in early spring. The curved sprays of forsythia were inserted in the urn first, then the narcissi, cinerarias and primroses. The forsythia completed the curve of the composition gold bird (American), thus making it an integral part of the composition. Such accessories can add greatly to plant groupings if they are harmonious in form, colour and general feeling. Frequently, as in this case, they suggest the whole composition.
8.Study in Pastels. The lovely pastel colours of hydrangeas more than make up for their lack of interest in form. Boil the severed ends in vinegar for a few seconds, then soak for several hours in deep water. Accessories— Medium needle holder. The flat bowl of French porcelain was selected for colour harmony.
9.Femininity Personified. Fuchsias have a lovely droopy habit of growth and they go right on drooping in this arrangement. Violets, tied in bunches, were grouped in the centre. The setting is definitely feminine with Victorian accents. Accessories—Needle holder. Old Parian vase.
10.Amaryllis. One of the so-called modern flowers. Bold in form and colour, they fit into today's uncluttered interiors. Here they were arranged with their own foliage in a simple symmetrical composition. Accessories—Heavy oblong needle holder. Large, hand bent glass bowl selected because shape and colour added to the modern effect desired.
11.Narcissi. An adaptation of a modern Japanese arrangement. Three holders were placed in the bowl in a triangular position, to create depth in the finished composition. Accessories—Three medium sized needle holders. Black base and oblong bowl.
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