Other formats

    Adobe Portable Document Format file (facsimile images)   TEI XML file   ePub eBook file  

Connect

    mail icontwitter iconBlogspot iconrss icon

Home & Building, Volume 12 Number 6 (June-July 1950)

Cutting Costs

Cutting Costs

These are, perhaps, large claims; but concrete instances can be cited to justify all of them. As an example of good design cutting manufacturing costs, I may quote from a recent account of the evolution, by an English manufacturer, of a metal hood for the viewing screen of an optical device. It was originally planned to make the hood from magnesium-alloy castings. The initial production batch, over which the cost of pattern equipment could be spread, was small, and the cost of the hoods would have worked out at £19 each. After consultation between the firm's engineering staff and a local group of designers, it was decided that the hoods should not be cast but spun; as a result, cost was brought down from £19 to £11—a worth-while reduction, surely.

Simplified production, resulting from a radical approach to the design problem, is shown in a new work-pan for use in foundries, made by a firm in the English Midlands. Such work-pans are of similar shape to many domestic baking tins, rectangular, flat-bottomed, sloping-sided. They have runners in the form of metal strips underneath to prevent wear and fear on the bottom. Usually these are riveted on, handles also are riveted on, and the corners of the pan are riveted together. In the new design, the handles and runners, instead of being attached separately to the body, are welded together, to form a cradle into which the body is then welded. Nor is page breakthis simplification for simplification's sake; it gives a more rugged construction and is said to increase considerably the useful life of the pans.

"Simplify and add more lightness" was the motto of the American aircraft designer, Bill Stout, but it is a command that is obeyed today in other countries besides America and other industries as well as aircraft. Lightness that benefits the lady of the house is found in a new home hair-dryer, designed by a London company, in conjunction with its consultant industrial designer. Mechanism and plastic housing adds up to a total weight of one lb. five ounces— less than half the weight of some rival makes.

A Pleasing Stream-Lined Condiment Set Designed and Moulded in Ivory, Blue, Green or Orange Using Urea-Formaldehyde Material.

A Pleasing Stream-Lined Condiment Set Designed and Moulded in Ivory, Blue, Green or Orange Using Urea-Formaldehyde Material.