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Home & Building, Volume 12 Number 6 (June-July 1950)

All the Difference

All the Difference

Again, an illumination meter recently redesigned, weights five and a half ounces as against the 14 ounces of the earlier model with a proportionate reduction in size, making all the difference between "pocketability" and the absence, of that quality, so desirable in a small portable instrument.

The same redesign also provides an instance of greater convenience in use. With the original type of meter, it was all too easy for the operator, in reading the scale, to put his head in such a position that it cast a shadow on the light-sensitive surface of the instrument, thus giving a false reading. Now the scale and the sensitive area are in different planes, and the operator no longer has to watch his shadow before he takes a reading.

Hand-Painting Flower Decorations on Pottery in a Staffordshire Factory.

Hand-Painting Flower Decorations on Pottery in a Staffordshire Factory.

One can, of course, find examples of the designer's intelligent appreciation of the user's requirements in more homely products also. A London designer has evolved a new shape of handle for a coffee-percolator which besides requiring less production-time for its attachment makes it practically impossible for the user to burn his fingers by contact with the hot metal body of the pot; it has a long tongue or spur which prevents him from doing so.

Again, solid plastic handles on saucepans are more I convenient than the old hollow metal type—they are poor conductors of heat; they do not provide crevices which collect dirt, and they do not hold water which is ready to dribble out, perhaps down your sleeve, when you dry the pan.