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Home and Building, Volume 37 Number 6 (1975)

Home and Building: A Near Victim

page 7

Home and Building: A Near Victim

One of the unfortunate side effects of galloping inflation is the disappearance of relatively inexpensive amenities that were taken for granted by provided small highlights of interest to their devotees. An example of this is in the field of periodic publication where weekly newspapers and monthly magazines have been forced out of print through rising production costs. While there are ways and means of offsetting increased expenditure there is also a limit to increased revenue from advertising and sales beyond which both advertisers and subscribers will not go, or can reality be asked to go.

Several well known publications have regrettably ceased to appear and recently Home & Building notified a similar intention. However, a last minute reprieve has made it possible to continue publication with no loss of standard, indeed the reverse is predicted, but on a basis of appearance six times a year. The only immediate change will be seen on the cover where a number will replace the date.

This domestic crisis can hardly be called momentous but the absence of the magazine would have left quite a gap in the telling of what is beihg built in New Zealand. There is no doubt that the average person is very much concerned with our buildings, especially houses, whether they relate to his scale of finance or not. Indeed the glossier the house the more interesting it becomes, evoking wonder, ideas or simply dreams. So too are the more impersonal buildings of industry and commerce, often well known, admired or disliked but rarely ignored.

Home & Building is aimed at people, not architects, and yet all the work illustrated is by architects. There are no banners being waved, no messages hammered out, the work must stand on its own for critical judgement by the reader who can be the harshest judge of all. It is, however, the only comprehensive digest of architects' ability and well deserves its place in the line up of other experts' ability be it in the field of cars, boats, consumer goods or any other thing a person may, if the desire is there, save up for and have.

We are pleased to be still with you.